Alexander Burness1,2

#971, b. 3 July 1790, d. 3 May 1871
     Alexander Burness was baptized on 3 July 1790 in Brawlinmuir, Glenbervie, Kincardineshire, Scotland.1 He was the son of David Burness and Katherine Milne.1,2 He married Mary Smith, daughter of James Smith and Elizabeth Fullarton, on 1 May 1823 in home of bride's father, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.3,2 He died on 3 May 1871 in Prospect Place, Banchory-Devenick, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, at age 80.2,4,5 He was buried on 9 May 1871 in St Nicholas Kirkyard, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.6,4

Children of Alexander Burness and Mary Smith

Citations

  1. OPR Glenbervie.
  2. Death Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  3. OPR Aberdeen St Nicholas.
  4. Gravestone Inscriptions of St Nicholas Kirkyard, Aberdeen.
  5. Aberdeen Journal, Aberdeen, Scotland.
  6. Deceased Online, Deceased Online.
  7. 1841 Scottish Census, Aberdeenshire.

James Burness1

#972, b. 3 November 1823, d. 18 October 1895
     James Burness was born on 3 November 1823 in Auchenblae, Fordoun, Kincardineshire, Scotland.1 He was the son of George Burness and Jean Alexander.1,2,3,4,5 He was baptized on 30 November 1823 in Auchenblae, Fordoun, Kincardineshire, Scotland.1 He married Elizabeth Hampton, daughter of Alexander Hampton and Margaret Ross, on 9 January 1860 in Manse, Peterculter, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.2,3 He died on 18 October 1895 in 12 Farmers Hall Lane, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, at age 71.3

Children of James Burness and Elizabeth Hampton

Citations

  1. OPR Fordoun.
  2. Marriage Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  3. Death Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  4. 1841 Scottish Census, Kincardineshire.
  5. 1851 Scottish Census, Kincardineshire.
  6. Birth Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  7. Death Registration, General Register Office for Scotland, transcribed by: Lawrence Ruxton Burness.
  8. 1861 Scottish Census, Aberdeenshire.
  9. 1871 Scottish Census, Aberdeenshire.
  10. 1881 Scottish Census, Aberdeenshire.
  11. FamilySearch, New York Marriage Indexes 1686-1980.

William Burness1

#973, b. 1 May 1826, d. 4 February 1873
     William Burness was born on 1 May 1826 in Milltimber, Peterculter, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.1 He was the son of David Burness and Agnes Smith.1,2 He was baptized on 15 May 1826 in Peterculter, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.1 He married Jane Berry on 15 August 1868 in St Matthew's, Albury, New South Wales, Australia.3 He died on 4 February 1873 in Fiji at age 46.4
     Obituary: MASSACRE IN FIJI - The arrival of the schooner Tui Lau, at Sydney from the South Sea Islands brings the tidings of another revolting massacre. The following particulars are from the Fiji Times of the 15th Feb., they having been supplied by a Mr. Oliver:

About halt-past sevon on Tuesday morning, 4th February, some of tho imported labor from Mr. Burn's plantation arrived at Barawal, stating that the mountaineers had killed Mr. Burns and his wife. Mr. Macintosh immediately despatched Messrs. Stirling and M'Grath, with about forty imported labor, to render assistance. In about half an hour they got in sight of the house, and saw them coming out of the house as thick as bees. When they saw the two white men coming they quietly walked away. Stirling and M'Grath followed them up the plantation until they crossead the river, where they managed to fetch down one at a long distance. In looking about the plantation they found the bodies of Mr. and Mrs. Burns some clistrance from the house, both quite naked and mutilated. In a short time after nearly all the settlers on the river were on the place. At the examination of the bodies I saw that Mr. Burns had been clubbed and tomahawked. His brains were beaton out, bottom jaw broken, two deep cuts on left breast, and one on the breast bone. He was found in the middle of the plantation, the place where he was murdered. One of the Tanna men ran to his assistance, and took a tomahawk which Mr. Burns had hold of with his left hand, from a mountaineer. Mr. Burns shot the Kai Colo through the head with his revolver. At the same time a great number more came up and surrounded him. He only managed to shoot two of them betore they managed to give him his death blow. The Tanna man ran to the river and got away; Mrs. Burns, poor lady, must have suffered agony by the look of her. She must have received two cuts with an axe or tomahawk on the top of her left shoulder on the first attack, her left hand was raised to the wounds, and still remain in the same position, now in her grave. She had a cut under her left jaw, part of her teeth down her throat. Two holes, one on each side, just above the hips, evidently made with a spear, which had passed through her body before she fell. I believe her death was caused by a club. The back of her head was beaten in, and a small portion of her brains out. She must have been killed at one corner of the house, under the verandah, for I saw a large pool of blood, some long hairs, and her back comb broken in pieces, altogether on the floor. She was then stripped naked, part of her dress torn into shreds, which I pickod up saturated with blood. They then dragged her by the hair of tho head, the trail of her body on the ground plainly to be seen up to the place where she was found, some distance up the plantation, face downward, with nothing on her but her wedding ring. The mountaineers, no doubt, were taking her away with the intention of eating her, but were too closely pursued by Stirling and M'Grath, and compelled to leave her. When the unfortunate lady saw her husband being murdered she sat down to write a note, supposecl to be to some of us for help, but evidently had no time. Their cook, a Tannese, said to her"Corne to the boat." "They are gone except the large one," she replied, "and it is too far in the river." Not being able to swim, and leave her babes behind in the hands of those blood-thirsty villiains, she could not make an attempt at the water. The above statement was made to me by the Tanna man himself, who took to the water and got away. The little boy was found outside the house with a deep cut on the right side of his head, and three deep cuts in the right groin, and his little head clubbed to a pulp. The little girl, an infant, was a shocking sight; it would appear they had taken her by the legs and dashed her brains out against the post of the bedroom door, and then dropped the child amongst its scattered brains. The four bodies were brought and laid out under the verandah side by side. As far as I can ascertain at present there are ten Erromanga men, five Tanna men, and one Solomon woman killed. Two Tanna men found with their legs cut off, and carrned away by the mountaineers ; also several other bodies, no doubt for a cannibal feast. A bundle of clothes was picked up by some of the imported labor far up the plantation. Another small bundle was also picked up, with a lot of cartridges, some baby's shoes and clothing, and a piece of Mrs. Burns's hair, no doubt pulled out of her head for the purpose of making threads for small beads with which to ornament their clubs, and other murderous weapons. They were very successful in taking away a number of guns, I think not less than twenty, but they did not get much ammunition.

Wednesday, 5th. — All the settlers on the river, and some from the coast, assembled at Earawai at twelve o'clock, to see the last of the unfortunate victims of these wretches in the mountains. Burial service was read, and the grave filled up. Most of the settlers went up to the plantation of Mr. Burns. The mountaineers are plainly to be seen to-day, with a large amount of their plunder spread out upon the rocks to dry. On Christmas day a great number of mountaineers were about the plantation. Mrs. Burns requested tho laborers to take their guns and drive them away ; but they answered, 'No — me shoot Kai Colo, white men come in steamer hang me.' They well remembered the threat that Clarkson made them, that if they shot at any more Kai Colos (suiting the action to the word, and placing a rope round the neck of one of the men), ' I will hang you.' The mountaineers sent us word to-day that they do not intend stopping at this, as they have had a complete success — murdered twenty in all, carried a great deal of property away, and destroyed very much more. We are informed that Tavua, Mr. Berry's plantation, is to be the next. We have received a letter from Mr. Berry to-day stating that he is expecting an attack hourly, there being a number of mountaineers about the place, no doubt watching every movement.

The verdict which the jury arrived at was as follows : — We beg to return the verdict of wilful murder against the mountaineers, on the bodies of William Burns, Jane Burns, and two children, and some twenty imported laborers, murdered on the same day. After carefully considering the evidence, it is our opinion that those murders would not have taken place had it not been for the unwise and unjust interference of the Government on the 22nd November last. It appears, from evidence, that a party of the Government officials, viz., Dr. Clarkson, Mr. Henry Thurston, Mr. Pritchard, together with a party of niggers, called soldiers, paid a visit to several stations, uninvited, amongst others to Vuni Samola, property of tho deceased. In the absence of deceased, Mr. Burns, tho aforesaid Dr. Clarkson, Minister of Finance, took the authority on himself, against tho expressed objection of deceased, Mrs. Burns, to convene a gathering of the labor on the place, cautioning them, in strong language, that if they attempted to shoot a mountaineer they would be hung: and, in the way of illustration, placed a small rope round the neck of one of the imported labor, showing how conveniently the Government could punish such an 'offence.' The labor, since that, have been unwilling to take up arms in defence of their employer, when ordered, and on this occasion abandoned the field, leaving their employer and family to the merciless attack of the mountaineers.

Children of William Burness and Jane Berry

Citations

  1. OPR Peterculter.
  2. 1841 Scottish Census, Aberdeenshire.
  3. Birth Registration, New South Wales Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, transcribed by: Lawrence Ruxton Burness.
  4. Lawrence Ruxton Burness, Burness Family Tree.

Robert Burns1

#974, b. 1821, d. 19 July 1879
     Robert Burns was born in 1821 in 15 Portsmouth Street, Camden, Middlesex, England.1,2 He was the son of Robert Burns and Emma Bland.1,2 He was baptized on 2 May 1821 in St Giles in the Fields, Middlesex, England.1 He married Mary Campbell, daughter of Walter Campbell and Mary McWilliam, on 24 September 1843 in Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.3,2 He died on 19 July 1879 in Muirheads Hospital, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.2

Child of Robert Burns and Mary Campbell

Citations

  1. Ancestry.com, London Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1920.
  2. Death Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  3. OPR Dumfries.
  4. Marriage Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  5. 1851 Scottish Census, Kircudbrightshire.
  6. 1861 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.

Thomas Brown1

#975, b. circa 1822, d. 9 April 1911
     Thomas Brown was born circa 1822 in Hawick, Roxburghshire, Scotland.2 He was the son of Charles Brown and Margaret Ferguson.3,1 He married Jane Emma Burns, daughter of Robert Burns and Emma Bland, on 9 November 1857 in English Street, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.3,1 He died on 9 April 1911 in 191 High Street, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.1

Children of Thomas Brown and Jane Emma Burns

Citations

  1. Death Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  2. 1861 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.
  3. Marriage Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  4. Birth Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  5. 1871 Canadian Census, Ontario.
  6. 1881 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.
  7. 1891 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.
  8. 1901 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.
  9. 1911 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.

Jane Armour Burns Brown1,2

#976, b. 10 June 1864, d. 11 November 1937
     Jane Armour Burns Brown was born on 10 June 1864 in 12 English Street, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.1 She was the daughter of Thomas Brown and Jane Emma Burns.1,2,3,4,5,6,7 She died on 11 November 1937 in Dumfries Infirmary, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, at age 73.2

Citations

  1. Birth Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  2. Death Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  3. 1871 Canadian Census, Ontario.
  4. 1881 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.
  5. 1891 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.
  6. 1901 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.
  7. 1911 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.

Mary Campbell

#977, b. 8 October 1819, d. 26 February 1873
     Mary Campbell was born on 8 October 1819 in Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.1 She was the daughter of Walter Campbell and Mary McWilliam.2,1 She was baptized on 18 October 1819 in Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.1 She married Robert Burns, son of Robert Burns and Emma Bland, on 24 September 1843 in Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.3,2 She died on 26 February 1873 in Loreburn Street, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, at age 53.2

Child of Mary Campbell and Robert Burns

Citations

  1. IGI.
  2. Death Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  3. OPR Dumfries.
  4. Marriage Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  5. 1851 Scottish Census, Kircudbrightshire.
  6. 1861 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.

Robert Burns1

#978, b. 14 February 1844, d. 2 January 1896
     Robert Burns was born on 14 February 1844 in Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.1 He was the son of Robert Burns and Mary Campbell.1,2,3,4,5 He was baptized on 30 September 1845 in Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.1 He married Jane Palmer, daughter of John Palmer and Isabella Brown, on 17 October 1871 in New Market Street, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.2,3 He died on 2 January 1896 in The Powder Magazine, Blackhall, Edinburgh, Scotland, at age 51.3

Child of Robert Burns and Jane Palmer

Citations

  1. OPR Dumfries.
  2. Marriage Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  3. Death Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  4. 1851 Scottish Census, Kircudbrightshire.
  5. 1861 Scottish Census, Dumfriesshire.
  6. Birth Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.

Jane Palmer1

#979, b. 19 October 1842, d. 29 May 1904
     Jane Palmer was born on 19 October 1842 in Mouswald, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.2 She was the daughter of John Palmer and Isabella Brown.3 She married Robert Burns, son of Robert Burns and Mary Campbell, on 17 October 1871 in New Market Street, Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.3,1 She died on 29 May 1904 in The Infirmary, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland, at age 61.1

Child of Jane Palmer and Robert Burns

Citations

  1. Death Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  2. FamilySearch, Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950.
  3. Marriage Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.
  4. Birth Registration, General Register Office for Scotland.

Anne Sherwood1

#980, b. circa 1772, d. 16 July 1835
     Anne Sherwood was born circa 1772.2 She married Robert Burns, son of Robert Burns and Jean Armour, on 24 March 1809 in St Marylebone, Middlesex, England.1 She died on 16 July 1835 in Dumfries, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.2

Child of Anne Sherwood and Robert Burns

Citations

  1. Ancestry.com, London Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1936.
  2. The Belfast New-Letter, Belfast.
  3. Ancestry.com, London Baptisms, Marriages and Burials 1538-1812.
  4. Research of Lawrence Ruxton Burness.